Let’s start with the fact that the 2017 was a relatively calm year, at least from serious Google algorithmic updates. By comparison, in 2016 we watched Penguin update, the emergence of Possum – affecting local search, a massive mobile search update, major changes to AdWords, and more.

Apart from the Fred update in March, the whole year was not very busy.

What was more impressive was the effort to improve the consumer experience (UX).

The upward trend of mobile optimization and self-learning machines will soon not change the course, so it’s good to get in 2018 with the following 5 SEO concepts.

SEO concepts 2018

Mobile-First Indexing Priority

It is a topic that has been chewing for quite some time. You’re probably aware that global mobile traffic is ahead of desktop traffic, and you know it’s good to have a site that’s handy for viewing through a smartphone or tablet. What you may not yet know is that at the end of last year, Google was firmly saying that ranking signals will now be taken from the mobile version of the site. In a nutshell, the optimization must start from the mobile site and only then look at the desktop version. The SEO Experts are perfect in this case.

Here are some practical tips on how to improve mobile SEO:

  • Test the mobile version
  • Correct broken links and incorrect rows
  • Compress large images
  • Remove the heavier animated content and blocked resources (JavaScript, CSS and possibly some images)
  • Limit or even remove obtrusive pop-ups
  • Improve usability – consider the viewport, the size of the font, the distance of the clickable elements

Semantic search

The Colibri update, which came in 2013, was to improve the accuracy of demand by setting the user’s intent more accurately.

Since then, semantic demand has evolved even further, and search engines are now better than ever in understanding requests and interrelations between words.

 

The purpose of semantic search is to develop to the point that, for example, if you are standing in front of a restaurant and ask Google a question, “Is it good here?”, The search engine understands that the “place” here refers to the particular establishment and deduces its assessment .

Semantic search is a complex concept, but in general, it makes sense that a authoritative page looking deeply into a specific topic will rank better than several pages targeting individual keywords. The logic is that a comprehensive and comprehensible resource would give more contextuality to Google. Accordingly, the search engine is more likely to serve this information to the user.

Here’s how to build content that meets semantic demand:

Choose a more general theme that’s interesting to your audience. For example, if you have a pet shelter, create a page for different breeds of dogs. Head to questions that will help you highlight the intentions of users. For example, on the above-mentioned dog breed page, talk about the characters of the different dogs or the dogs that can be trained.

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